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Intro


WRITING

Below you'll find a selection of clips arranged by enterprise, longform, news and about a study. Take a look and if you see something you like, click the button to read more.

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Intro


WRITING

Below you'll find a selection of clips arranged by enterprise, longform, news and about a study. Take a look and if you see something you like, click the button to read more.


Longform Writing


Longform

Longform Writing


Longform

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Secret Shells


The Secret Science of Shell Seeking

At the lowest tide of the month, the Gulf of Mexico peels back from the shores of Sanibel Island to reveal its treasures. Bruce Schulz is out there on a late  February morning to find his piece of the booty.

The early morning sun stretches the shadow of his lanky frame from the shore to the mangroves. The waves are lapping against City Beach, which juts off the eastern flank of Sanibel Island’s 33 square miles like a bird’s beak.

Dozens of others are out on the beach with Schulz. They’re all looking for shells, in the shelling capital of America.

Read More

Secret Shells


The Secret Science of Shell Seeking

At the lowest tide of the month, the Gulf of Mexico peels back from the shores of Sanibel Island to reveal its treasures. Bruce Schulz is out there on a late  February morning to find his piece of the booty.

The early morning sun stretches the shadow of his lanky frame from the shore to the mangroves. The waves are lapping against City Beach, which juts off the eastern flank of Sanibel Island’s 33 square miles like a bird’s beak.

Dozens of others are out on the beach with Schulz. They’re all looking for shells, in the shelling capital of America.

Read More

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Glacier National Park


Documenting Glaciers in the Dying Days of Ice

National Parks have grown up with photography. So it’s only fitting that in the last days of ice in Montana’s Glacier National Park, Lisa McKeon is using a camera to show how quickly climate change has killed off the park’s namesakes. After all, it’s one thing to note that of the park’s 150 glaciers that existed in the late 1800s, only 25 of them remain today. But it’s another to see what that cold, hard fact looks like on the landscape.

For nearly 20 years, McKeon, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, has prowled dusty archives to find old photos showing the splendor of the park’s glaciers in decades past. Those images have taken her to bushwhacking through the forest and to the highest reaches of the park so she can recreate those images.

Read More

Glacier National Park


Documenting Glaciers in the Dying Days of Ice

National Parks have grown up with photography. So it’s only fitting that in the last days of ice in Montana’s Glacier National Park, Lisa McKeon is using a camera to show how quickly climate change has killed off the park’s namesakes. After all, it’s one thing to note that of the park’s 150 glaciers that existed in the late 1800s, only 25 of them remain today. But it’s another to see what that cold, hard fact looks like on the landscape.

For nearly 20 years, McKeon, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, has prowled dusty archives to find old photos showing the splendor of the park’s glaciers in decades past. Those images have taken her to bushwhacking through the forest and to the highest reaches of the park so she can recreate those images.

Read More

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Ice, Ice Maybe


Ice, Ice Maybe

After taking photos from afar, Archer works his way up the talus slope toward the dirty ice. At times, the slope becomes steep enough that it requires climbing hand over hand. The tinkle of tumbling rocks meshes with the rush of water as the men get closer to the glacier’s terminus.

Stopping to jot some notes, Archer casually throws out a question to his guide. “So, how much has this glacier retreated in your lifetime?”

The guide answers without a pause. “It hasn’t really changed at all.”

Although neither Archer nor his guide knew it, this offhand observation would open a whole new field of research for Archer and a collaborator back in Newcastle. The guide’s observation flew in the face of previous work in the Himalayas, which had shown that glaciers were shrinking, as one would expect in a warming world.

Read More

Ice, Ice Maybe


Ice, Ice Maybe

After taking photos from afar, Archer works his way up the talus slope toward the dirty ice. At times, the slope becomes steep enough that it requires climbing hand over hand. The tinkle of tumbling rocks meshes with the rush of water as the men get closer to the glacier’s terminus.

Stopping to jot some notes, Archer casually throws out a question to his guide. “So, how much has this glacier retreated in your lifetime?”

The guide answers without a pause. “It hasn’t really changed at all.”

Although neither Archer nor his guide knew it, this offhand observation would open a whole new field of research for Archer and a collaborator back in Newcastle. The guide’s observation flew in the face of previous work in the Himalayas, which had shown that glaciers were shrinking, as one would expect in a warming world.

Read More

News, Explained


News, Explained

News, Explained


News, Explained

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Puerto Rico Power


Puerto Rico Has a Once In a Lifetime Opportunity to Rethink How It Gets Electricity

 

Alina Saenz’s house on the outskirts of San Juan glows warmly in the pitch black nights that have plagued Puerto Rico in the two weeks since Category 4 Hurricane Maria devastated the island. The imperceptible hum of the refrigerator, fans to circulate the humid tropical air and nightly news on the television were all afterthoughts of modern life before the storm but are now godsends in its wake for an island still largely without power.

 

 

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Puerto Rico Power


Puerto Rico Has a Once In a Lifetime Opportunity to Rethink How It Gets Electricity

 

Alina Saenz’s house on the outskirts of San Juan glows warmly in the pitch black nights that have plagued Puerto Rico in the two weeks since Category 4 Hurricane Maria devastated the island. The imperceptible hum of the refrigerator, fans to circulate the humid tropical air and nightly news on the television were all afterthoughts of modern life before the storm but are now godsends in its wake for an island still largely without power.

 

 

Read More

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Colorado Climate Law


Colorado’s Climate Lawsuit Could Be a Template For Flyover Country

Climate lawsuits have been piling up on the coasts. But a pioneering duo of Colorado counties and the city of Boulder have filed the first landlocked lawsuit against big oil earlier this week, suing Exxon and tar sands producer Suncor Energy.

It represents a new front in the legal war that’s pitting communities stuck paying for the costs of climate change against the companies that caused it. And it could spread to neighboring states in flyover country.

Read More

Colorado Climate Law


Colorado’s Climate Lawsuit Could Be a Template For Flyover Country

Climate lawsuits have been piling up on the coasts. But a pioneering duo of Colorado counties and the city of Boulder have filed the first landlocked lawsuit against big oil earlier this week, suing Exxon and tar sands producer Suncor Energy.

It represents a new front in the legal war that’s pitting communities stuck paying for the costs of climate change against the companies that caused it. And it could spread to neighboring states in flyover country.

Read More

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California Climate


California Should Fight Inequality to Fight Climate Change

 

California announced a sweeping rooftop solar mandate earlier this month. The first-in-the-nation policy will require all newly-constructed homes and small apartments to have solar panels on their roofs starting in 2020.

It’s a radical move that amounts to save the planet, screw the poor. Things don’t have to be this way, though. There are climate policies at California’s disposal that could also help solve some of the state’s other major problems, namely a dearth of affordable housing, and transit-oriented infrastructure. And they could be more effective at reducing carbon emissions than rooftop solar, to boot.

 

Read More

California Climate


California Should Fight Inequality to Fight Climate Change

 

California announced a sweeping rooftop solar mandate earlier this month. The first-in-the-nation policy will require all newly-constructed homes and small apartments to have solar panels on their roofs starting in 2020.

It’s a radical move that amounts to save the planet, screw the poor. Things don’t have to be this way, though. There are climate policies at California’s disposal that could also help solve some of the state’s other major problems, namely a dearth of affordable housing, and transit-oriented infrastructure. And they could be more effective at reducing carbon emissions than rooftop solar, to boot.

 

Read More

Analysis


Analysis

Analysis


Analysis

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Arctic Tipping Point


Has the Arctic Finally Reached a Tipping Point?

Something is not right in the Arctic. The recent wave of mild, humid air and its attendant impacts is disturbing. But this is the fourth winter where we’ve seen a veritable heat wave rack the Arctic.

The warm temperatures have also been accompanied by moist air, which has helped form clouds and lock in temperatures up to 60 degrees Fahrenheit above normal for extended periods in a typically dry, frozen climate. Disappearing sea ice also means warmer ocean waters are exposed, further spinning the region out of whack.

Read More

Arctic Tipping Point


Has the Arctic Finally Reached a Tipping Point?

Something is not right in the Arctic. The recent wave of mild, humid air and its attendant impacts is disturbing. But this is the fourth winter where we’ve seen a veritable heat wave rack the Arctic.

The warm temperatures have also been accompanied by moist air, which has helped form clouds and lock in temperatures up to 60 degrees Fahrenheit above normal for extended periods in a typically dry, frozen climate. Disappearing sea ice also means warmer ocean waters are exposed, further spinning the region out of whack.

Read More

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500 Women Scientists


There’s No Excuse For Not Getting a Woman Scientist's Input Anymore

 In September, Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard visited Colorado State’s Fort Collins campus to give a talk on conservation. After his remarks, a panel featuring local science, business, and policy leaders discussed the implications of climate change.

All four panelists were white dudes. So was the moderator. Katarzyna Nowak, a fellow at The Safina Center and research associate at University of the Free State (Qwaqwa), located in New York and South Africa respectively, sat in the audience and felt her frustration grow. Nowak decided after the panel that she’d had enough.

Read More

500 Women Scientists


There’s No Excuse For Not Getting a Woman Scientist's Input Anymore

 In September, Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard visited Colorado State’s Fort Collins campus to give a talk on conservation. After his remarks, a panel featuring local science, business, and policy leaders discussed the implications of climate change.

All four panelists were white dudes. So was the moderator. Katarzyna Nowak, a fellow at The Safina Center and research associate at University of the Free State (Qwaqwa), located in New York and South Africa respectively, sat in the audience and felt her frustration grow. Nowak decided after the panel that she’d had enough.

Read More

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Zaria Forman is Finding Beauty in the Things We’re Losing


Zaria Forman is Finding Beauty in the Things We’re Losing

Loss is like a black hole, sucking everything nearby into its orbit. It shapes everything left behind, reframes relationships, leaves you grasping for memories as they peel away into the murky abyss of time. You can realize all these things and yet still be completely unprepared for loss when it arrives. What if there were a warning, a reminder of all the beauty that you can still save?

That’s the proposition put forward in Zaria Forman’s drawings. They show the rapid loss of polar ice to the sea. It’s a loss set in motion by human carbon pollution, but one that humanity is also uniquely poised to halt (or at least slow).

 

Read More

Zaria Forman is Finding Beauty in the Things We’re Losing


Zaria Forman is Finding Beauty in the Things We’re Losing

Loss is like a black hole, sucking everything nearby into its orbit. It shapes everything left behind, reframes relationships, leaves you grasping for memories as they peel away into the murky abyss of time. You can realize all these things and yet still be completely unprepared for loss when it arrives. What if there were a warning, a reminder of all the beauty that you can still save?

That’s the proposition put forward in Zaria Forman’s drawings. They show the rapid loss of polar ice to the sea. It’s a loss set in motion by human carbon pollution, but one that humanity is also uniquely poised to halt (or at least slow).

 

Read More

ABOUT A STUDY


About A Study

ABOUT A STUDY


About A Study

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Geoengineering


Once We Start Geoengineering, We Won't Be Able To Stop

 

A new study published on Monday in Nature Ecology and Evolution gives us some our first clues of what geoengineering would mean for the world’s wildlife. The study shows that while geoengineering could improve life for most plants and animals currently suffering the effects of climate change, it comes with two major catches.

The first is that geoengineering itself would devastate the Amazon. The second, even more dire finding, is that once we start geoengineering the climate, we can’t stop because if we did, everything would go to hell in a hand basket.

 

Read More

Geoengineering


Once We Start Geoengineering, We Won't Be Able To Stop

 

A new study published on Monday in Nature Ecology and Evolution gives us some our first clues of what geoengineering would mean for the world’s wildlife. The study shows that while geoengineering could improve life for most plants and animals currently suffering the effects of climate change, it comes with two major catches.

The first is that geoengineering itself would devastate the Amazon. The second, even more dire finding, is that once we start geoengineering the climate, we can’t stop because if we did, everything would go to hell in a hand basket.

 

Read More

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Climate Economics


Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.

Union County is tucked in northern Florida, half an hour north of Gainesville and an hour west of Jacksonville. It’s Florida’s smallest county, a mostly unremarkable landlocked stretch of pine forest interspersed with lakes.

More than 15,000 people call it home, working largely in healthcare, transportation and public administration. The state prison and Target distribution center are among the county’s notable employers. The unemployment rate is low at around 4 percent, but most jobs aren’t high paying. As a result, Union County is Florida’s poorest county by per capita income.

New research shows there’s something else that makes Union County unique: it’s ground zero for the economic damage that climate change will cause in the U.S.

Read More

Climate Economics


Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.

Union County is tucked in northern Florida, half an hour north of Gainesville and an hour west of Jacksonville. It’s Florida’s smallest county, a mostly unremarkable landlocked stretch of pine forest interspersed with lakes.

More than 15,000 people call it home, working largely in healthcare, transportation and public administration. The state prison and Target distribution center are among the county’s notable employers. The unemployment rate is low at around 4 percent, but most jobs aren’t high paying. As a result, Union County is Florida’s poorest county by per capita income.

New research shows there’s something else that makes Union County unique: it’s ground zero for the economic damage that climate change will cause in the U.S.

Read More

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Flat Earth Millenials


Millennials Can’t Buy Homes, But Can They Buy That the Earth Is Flat?

 

Hey, there’s another reason to shake our collective heads at everyone’s favorite generational punching bag. A recently-published YouGov poll that surveyed 8,215 adults online found that a only two-thirds of young millennials, aged 18-24, are totally sure the Earth is round.

Look, I love shitting on millennials to compensate for my fear of growing old and irrelevant as much as the next person. And this poll is pretty damn embarrassing for the youngs. But let’s slow down and talk about what it’s actually telling us.

 

Read More

Flat Earth Millenials


Millennials Can’t Buy Homes, But Can They Buy That the Earth Is Flat?

 

Hey, there’s another reason to shake our collective heads at everyone’s favorite generational punching bag. A recently-published YouGov poll that surveyed 8,215 adults online found that a only two-thirds of young millennials, aged 18-24, are totally sure the Earth is round.

Look, I love shitting on millennials to compensate for my fear of growing old and irrelevant as much as the next person. And this poll is pretty damn embarrassing for the youngs. But let’s slow down and talk about what it’s actually telling us.

 

Read More